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Old 05-03-2019, 08:44 AM   #1
daperrin
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La Jolla - How To Find Surf and Wind Conditions

Hi all. Looking to plan my first trip to LJ. I normally use Surfline and MagicSeaweed for weather. Any tips on what you use to check conditions and what is the max you want to see for swell and wind.

I see there is a scrippts pier/La Jolla location on MagicSeaweed. Is that normally where you launch?
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Old 05-03-2019, 10:18 AM   #2
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For La Jolla I like http://www.surf-forecast.com/breaks/...latest/six_day


I would recommend launching in the kayak launch area at the end of Av. de la Playa. Especially as crowds of people are growing as we move into summer:
https://www.google.com/maps/@32.8556...7.257611,17.5z


Keep your eyes peeled. Some beach-goers will snorkel right through the kayak launch zone without thinking. Children will play anywhere, oblivious to getting hit by a kayak coming in.



For SD Bay I like https://tides4fishing.com/us/califor...antine-station


I like fishing in good weather on beautiful days. launching through 3' waves or less is very enjoyable. Wind <15 is nice too, depending on direction and gusts or steady. I like a peaceful current and tide flow that I don't have to fight against.


During some times of the year, I watch dew point and water temperature. If it's within 4 degrees then fog could be an issue to consider.
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Old 05-03-2019, 12:33 PM   #3
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Windy.com has been the most reliable for me for wind conditions (although it is even harder to predict than the weather).

If you have access to Surfline.com, then you want to check for La Jolla Shores. But you can even take that with a large portion of salt. The launch is well protected, and will kill swells from most directions. You might want to be cautious on days with multiple swells over 3', short interval swells (under 9 secs.), days with a decent swell (up to about 5')out of the WNW area or days with large swells (over 5') anywhere from the West.

If you don't have Surfline access, try NOAA Marine Weather Forecast marineweather.gov
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Old 05-04-2019, 09:51 AM   #4
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Great information! I too am planning for my first LJ trip.
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Old 05-04-2019, 03:48 PM   #5
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LJ Weather Conditions

Thanks for the info guys. I found this info during some online searches. Very interesting...
http://larryl.com/?page_id=65
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Old 05-05-2019, 10:55 AM   #6
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Thanks for the info guys.

Good luck! Have fun kayal fishing!
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Old 05-06-2019, 08:15 AM   #7
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During some times of the year, I watch dew point and water temperature. If it's within 4 degrees then fog could be an issue to consider.

I've been watching the weather and forecasts nearly daily for probably 10-12 years and have a pretty good understanding of weather/wind/swell/current etc.


But never even considered the conditions that cause fog. Can you explain this one a little more?
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Old 05-06-2019, 09:59 AM   #8
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I've been watching the weather and forecasts nearly daily for probably 10-12 years and have a pretty good understanding of weather/wind/swell/current etc.

But never even considered the conditions that cause fog. Can you explain this one a little more?
As a private pilot who flew a small Cessna 172 for about 10 years, I flew by VFR and dead reckoning (I fly in good weather by looking out the window and following landmarks.) I always looked at dew point and temperature during conditions and times of the year when it might have an impact on visibility.

In coastal areas of southern CA, depending on weather patterns, we sometimes have "May Grays" and "June Gloom" seasons. This is a time of year when fog can materialize because the air is full of moisture.

Dew point is when moisture sublimates out of the air into another form, such as fog. That point can be higher or lower depending on temperature and barometric pressure. When the two points are within 4 degrees of each other, we can suddenly find ourselves flying blind or in instrument conditions. Ditto for fog banks on the water.

On the water in a kayak, I look at water temperature, because that's a more accurate measurement of the air temperature just above the surface of the water than "air temperature" from weather reports which takes in other factors. However, that can be affected by air currents, so I'm talking about rough estimates and things to consider. That's why "4 degrees" is a rule of thumb for common sense flying and caution, because it's close to the dew point.

The amount of water that can be held in a gaseous state in the air is also related to relative humidity. Warmer air can hold more humidity.

https://www.livescience.com/43269-what-is-dew-point.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relative_humidity

I know very little about marine weather conditions for boating. Experience flying is different, I'm sure, but it still makes me think about these things. You should run your question under the nose of a good mariner, then report back so the rest of us can benefit from your curiosity.
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Old 05-07-2019, 07:10 PM   #9
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I've been watching the weather and forecasts nearly daily for probably 10-12 years and have a pretty good understanding of weather/wind/swell/current etc.


But never even considered the conditions that cause fog. Can you explain this one a little more?
Is there a site you use to determine the current? I usually check the surf and wind forecast. A few weeks ago everything looked “perfect”, no wind or waves but the current was ripping? Thanks
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Old 05-08-2019, 04:34 AM   #10
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Is there a site you use to determine the current? I usually check the surf and wind forecast. A few weeks ago everything looked “perfect”, no wind or waves but the current was ripping? Thanks


Big tide swings have a lot to do with that. I’ve always done better on Pelagics with the ripping current. Fish feed and move around more in heavy current.
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Old 05-08-2019, 06:33 AM   #11
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Is there a site you use to determine the current? I usually check the surf and wind forecast. A few weeks ago everything looked “perfect”, no wind or waves but the current was ripping? Thanks
Here's a good one. Not perfect but helpful.

http://www.sccoos.org/data/hfrnet/
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Old 05-09-2019, 01:18 PM   #12
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Here's a good one. Not perfect but helpful.

http://www.sccoos.org/data/hfrnet/


Also paying attention to tide swings helps determine currents. More tide swing = heavier currents. Usually strongest currents are on full and new moons.
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